MODERN DIY'S


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Jeff Martin is no stranger to Plastolux as we did a “Method Behind” with him that you can read here. Jeff sent me a project he recently completed called the Coastal Credenza. I got pretty excited looking through the pictures of this piece, the credenza is amazing on so many levels. The steel base with the adjustable wood feet look so nice together. I have always been a sucker for a wood that has an amazing wood grained pattern. What I really appreciated is that details are found throughout this piece, one could easily skimp once they got past the pretty wood but Jeff did not take that route.

credenza jeff martin modern

credenza jeff martin modern

credenza jeff martin modern

credenza jeff martin modern

credenza jeff martin modern

credenza jeff martin modern

credenza jeff martin modern

credenza jeff martin modern

credenza jeff martin modern

credenza jeff martin modern

Solid Claro Walnut fronts
Powdercoated black steel base and pulls
Adjustable walnut feet
Bleached spalted maple interior
Integrated wine storage
Dovetailed construction
Sunset orange high gloss lacquer
Softclose slides and hinges
Threaded bronze adjustable shelf supports

http://jeffmartinjoinery.ca/
Photo: Thomas Nugent Photography


 


  • david

    This guy is the poor man’s bddw. Look at his stuff…well crafted but zero design originality.

  • Craig

    Totally disagree. His walnut cabinet (record credenza according to woodindesign.com) is fresh as hell! Plus that coastal one, is so cool. Different colours, solid fronts instead of veneered, laser cut cabinetmaker mallet pulls, bleached maple interior, wine compartments, levelling walnut feet, and a thin edge reveal – so new. Love it!

  • Jon

    Awesome pulls, awesome colours. Is he producing anything in smaller sizes? That asymmetrical one is sick too!

  • Sara

    BDDW is rad, but their stuff is definitely inspired by designs that existed even before the founders were born. I was listening to an interview with the guys at BDDW a few years ago, and they spoke about this topic, saying that if they achieve 1% design originality/creativity in their lifetime, they will have succeeded. I think that’s a great way to think about it. There are lots of credenzas out there with a mid-century design kind of look – cantilevered, pull drawers, sliding drawers, whatever. BDDW put a beautiful spin on their version. This guy put a beautiful spin on his, with all the differences laid out in the post above by Craig. This is the furniture design business.

  • Anna Vee

    Excellent mix of tone. From the sunset orange to the cloudlike bleached maple, and the woodsy walnut I can see that he drew his inspiration from the westcoast. I would die for one!

  • david

    craig/jon/sara/anna vee = jeff martin

  • http://jeffmartinjoinery.ca Jeff Martin Joinery

    Sorry you feel that way David, thanks for the kudos on the craftsmanship. I learned well from Palo that nothing ever leaves the shop unless it’s perfect!

    In regards to the comment comparing me to Tyler Hays’ fantastic company – I’m bummed you are making the comparison. But I respect your opinion and have crafted a line of furniture over the past couple years which I feel is really original stuff. But inevitably, haters gonna hate.

    As Tyler of Plastolux put it to me, “if no one hates your work, no one’s gonna love it either.” Amen to that.

    The part about your comment that actually bothers me the most is the fact that I’m a poor man’s anything. I try to tailor goods to any budget, but as my motto goes, “Handcrafted with Outstanding Materials”. This does not typically lend itself to being inexpensive.

    And unfortunately, you are doing disservice to my past clients and prospective buyers when you make slanderous comments like this. It may surprise you to know that some of my work stands in rooms with/amongst/adjacent to (unbelievable) BDDW product. It fits well together, but is obviously crafted from different minds. And my incredible network of architects, interior designers, clients, and other industry professionals see this as well. Sorry you don’t.

  • david

    it’s no different than palo samko – his chairs are direct copies of Sam Maloof, his (and yours) patchwork tables are direct copies of bddw (i wonder how these inlays will hold up over the long term given the wood movement of the slabs), you have copied bddw dining table bases EXACTLY, samko has copied their cast bronze credenza legs. i’m not saying the stuff isn’t nice stuff, but some people would rather spend $15k to $20k on one of your pieces if they can’t justify (or afford) spending $50k on a bddw dining table or $20k on a credenza. people are buying your stuff – good for you, but you have to look in the mirror everyday and realize that much of your work shows any originality.

  • Colin

    Good point about the patchwork. I’ve thought this myself. But I think about that with Nakashima keys too. Probably the most important issu is finish. Penetrating oil would work, but lacuer would probably crack.

    I’m pretty sure Palo did some work with Maloof. Also young man, do your homework. BDDW tables and flower bed are heavily unfluenced by Roy McMakin – patchwork is not BDDW’s ivention. BDDW round tables with the cast legs based off a sanko design. Stuff flows both ways. There will always be predecessors. It sounds like you are taking this fairly prsnly. BDDW does cool shit, as does Roy/Palo/Jeff/Fern/Sawkille/DylanDesignCo/AlmaAllan/on and ON and ON. Rawk!


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